Gift of Alastair B. Martin, Class of 1938

Medium

Winslow Homer is one of the best known painters of American scenes of outdoor life. After an apprenticeship in lithography, Homer began his career as an illustrator for Harper's, drawing scenes of the Civil War battlefront. After the war, he traveled to Europe and then spent the summer of 1873 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he began to work in watercolor—what would eventually became his primary medium. Homer's outdoor genre scenes painted a varied picture of Americana, from scenes of wilderness guides, to rural African American life in the post-Civil War era, to children at play. In 1881, he spent almost two years on the English coast depicting simple scenes of the local communities. As his career evolved, Homer turned more and more to the sea, and a move to a secluded spot in coastal Maine prompted the eternal struggle between man and nature to become a prominent theme in his work.

Collected by major museums
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum , Yale University Art Gallery
Selected exhibitions
2019
Selections from the Department of Drawings and Prints: Leonardo da VinciThe Metropolitan Museum of Art
2018
Coming Away: Winslow Homer and EnglandMilwaukee Art Museum
2017
Wild: Michael NicholsPhiladelphia Museum of Art
View all

Eastern Point Light, 1880

Watercolor over graphite on cream wove paper
9 7/10 × 13 2/5 in
24.6 × 34.1 cm
Location
Princeton

Gift of Alastair B. Martin, Class of 1938

Medium

Winslow Homer is one of the best known painters of American scenes of outdoor life. After an apprenticeship in lithography, Homer began his career as an illustrator for Harper's, drawing scenes of the Civil War battlefront. After the war, he traveled to Europe and then spent the summer of 1873 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, where he began to work in watercolor—what would eventually became his primary medium. Homer's outdoor genre scenes painted a varied picture of Americana, from scenes of wilderness guides, to rural African American life in the post-Civil War era, to children at play. In 1881, he spent almost two years on the English coast depicting simple scenes of the local communities. As his career evolved, Homer turned more and more to the sea, and a move to a secluded spot in coastal Maine prompted the eternal struggle between man and nature to become a prominent theme in his work.

Collected by major museums
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum , Yale University Art Gallery
Selected exhibitions (3)
Other works by Winslow Homer
Related works