Wolf Kahn, ‘SECRET MEADOW (signed twice with unique personal inscription to renowned art critic, with signed letter of provenance)’, 1974, Alpha 137 Gallery
Wolf Kahn, ‘SECRET MEADOW (signed twice with unique personal inscription to renowned art critic, with signed letter of provenance)’, 1974, Alpha 137 Gallery
Wolf Kahn, ‘SECRET MEADOW (signed twice with unique personal inscription to renowned art critic, with signed letter of provenance)’, 1974, Alpha 137 Gallery
Wolf Kahn, ‘SECRET MEADOW (signed twice with unique personal inscription to renowned art critic, with signed letter of provenance)’, 1974, Alpha 137 Gallery

This poignant yellow pastel landscape is by the renowned painter Wolf Kahn, whose work is famously characterized by abstraction and figuration, as his gorgeously colored landscapes transform into color fields. This particular work is especially valuable because it came from the private collection of distinguished art critic and artist Lawrence (Larry) Campbell, who received it as a gift from Wolf Kahn in 1974. It is accompanied by a hand signed and dated Letter of Provenance from Mr. Campbell's daughter which reads, "This painting has been in my home since 1974 when it was given to my father, the late Lawrence (Larry) Campbell, by the artist, Wolf Kahn. In the lower right hand corner of the painting, Mr. Kahn wrote in pencil, 'To Larry in friendship- Wolf 1974.' My father was also a painter, a Director at the Arts Students League of New York, Professor of Art at Pratt Institute & Brooklyn College and an Art Critic for Art News and Art in America Magazines, for over 50 years." The work is also hand signed by the artist, lower left, so it bears two signatures. (For security purposes, the letter is not reproduced here, but the buyer of this work will receive the original hand signed letter from Larry Campbell's daughter.) This work is held in its original 1970s vintage wooden frame with plexiglass.
The sheet itself measures approx. 11 inches by 13.5 inches
The frame measures 16.5 inches by 19.5 inches

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Signature: signed lower left recto (front), titled lower middle, also inscribed, dated and signed again lower middle and right recto (front)

The private collection of art critic Lawrence (Larry) Campbell, who received it as a gift from Wolf Kahn in 1974, thence by descent to Mr. Campbell's daughter. It is accompanied by a hand signed and dated Letter of Provenance from Mr. Campbell's daughter which reads, "This painting has been in my home since 1974 when it was given to my father, the late Lawrence (Larry) Campbell, by the artist, Wolf Kahn. In the lower right hand corner of the painting, Mr. Kahn wrote in pencil, 'To Larry in friendship- Wolf 1974.' My father was also a painter, a Director at the Arts Students League of New York, Professor of Art at Pratt Institute & Brooklyn College and an Art Critic for Art News and Art in America Magazines, for over 50 years." The work is also hand signed by the artist, lower left, so it bears to signatures. (For security purposes, the letter is not reproduced, but the buyer of this work will receive the original hand signed letter from Larry Campbell's daughter.

About Wolf Kahn

A second-generation New York School artist, Wolf Kahn paints luminous New England landscapes. Lyrical and vibrant, Kahn’s paintings feature forests and farmlands rendered in fantastic colors. A student of Hans Hofmann and influenced early on by Milton Avery (and the work of James Abbott McNeill Whistler on a trip to Venice), Kahn would become known for his unique combination of realism with the expressive immediacy of Abstract Expressionism. His soft, modulated tonalities reveal the additional influence he absorbed from Mark Rothko, Henri Matisse, and Giorgio Morandi. The signature landscapes Kahn began in the late 1960s are grounded in the ethos of his Vermont farm: weathered barns and undulating pastures and tree lines, revealing a spare yet evocative New England aesthetic. He works intuitively, attempting to harness the energy of the human-nature interaction and preferring not to overthink the psychological meaning of his paintings. “I think the more you concentrate on factors other than emotional content in your paintings, the better off you are,” he has said. "Nature and the artist’s feelings are merely the raw materials.”

American, b. 1927, Stuttgart, Germany, based in New York, New York

Exhibition Highlights

2017
Washington,
Wolf Kahn: Density and Transparency in Monotypes