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Xu Bing 徐冰, ‘Landscript’, 2013, Christie's South Asian + Chinese
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Xu Bing 徐冰

Landscript, 2013

Ink on paper
31 7/10 × 52 in
80.5 × 132 cm
About the work
Medium
Drawing, Collage or other Work on Paper
Image rights
[Christie's](http://www.christiesprivatesales.com/exhibitions/chinese-contemporary-ink/index.aspx)
Xu Bing 徐冰
Chinese, b. 1955
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Pioneering Chinese contemporary artist Xu Bing creates powerful, poignant mixed-media installations, in which he subverts systems of language, upending expectations and perception. He explains that his works “are all linked by a common thread, which is to construct some kind of obstacle to people's habitual ways of thinking—what I call the ‘cognitive structures’ of the mind.” Trained as a printmaker, Xu is informed by the Cultural Revolution, Chan Buddhism, and his keen interest in the relationship between meaning and words, writing, and reading. He has famously re-invented Chinese characters and the English alphabet, rendering Chinese nonsensical and English into legible Chinese characters, effectively challenging comprehension of both. In Book from the Sky (1987-91), Xu filled a gallery with scrolls and books hand-printed with 4,000 “false” Chinese characters—a stunning commentary on the subjectivity of language and its meaning.

Xu Bing 徐冰, ‘Landscript’, 2013, Christie's South Asian + Chinese
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Medium
Drawing, Collage or other Work on Paper
Image rights
[Christie's](http://www.christiesprivatesales.com/exhibitions/chinese-contemporary-ink/index.aspx)
Xu Bing 徐冰
Chinese, b. 1955
Follow

Pioneering Chinese contemporary artist Xu Bing creates powerful, poignant mixed-media installations, in which he subverts systems of language, upending expectations and perception. He explains that his works “are all linked by a common thread, which is to construct some kind of obstacle to people's habitual ways of thinking—what I call the ‘cognitive structures’ of the mind.” Trained as a printmaker, Xu is informed by the Cultural Revolution, Chan Buddhism, and his keen interest in the relationship between meaning and words, writing, and reading. He has famously re-invented Chinese characters and the English alphabet, rendering Chinese nonsensical and English into legible Chinese characters, effectively challenging comprehension of both. In Book from the Sky (1987-91), Xu filled a gallery with scrolls and books hand-printed with 4,000 “false” Chinese characters—a stunning commentary on the subjectivity of language and its meaning.

Xu Bing 徐冰

Landscript, 2013

Ink on paper
31 7/10 × 52 in
80.5 × 132 cm
Other works by Xu Bing 徐冰
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Engaged with Traditional Chinese Art
Use of Traditional Techniques