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Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson, ‘Ngayuku Ngura’, 2014, Piermarq
Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson, ‘Ngayuku Ngura’, 2014, Piermarq
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Ngayuku Ngura, 2014

Acrylic on Belgian linen
22 × 28 in
56 × 71 cm
Sold
Location
Sydney
About the work
Exhibition history
Bibliography
Medium
Painting
Image rights
Piermarq & the artist
Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson
Australian First Nation, b. 1930
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Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson (or Tommy Watson for short) was a desert nomad for many years before he became a prominent figure in the Western Desert Art Movement in Australia. When he started painting, he was well acquainted with the Papunya Tula painters of the 1970s and ’80s. However, Watson differed from his peers who frequently referenced aboriginal creations myths, believing instead that painting sacred iconography was sacrilegious and deliberately adopting abstraction as his dominant style. His graphic, saturated paintings still carry a narrative weight for the artist, however, referring to the histories of his grandparents and their homeland. “I want to paint these stories so that others can learn and understand about our culture and country,” he says. Watson is also recognized as a skilled and subtle colorist—for one work he used 12 distinct shades of red.

Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson, ‘Ngayuku Ngura’, 2014, Piermarq
Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson, ‘Ngayuku Ngura’, 2014, Piermarq
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
Save
Save
View
View in room
Share
Share
About the work
Exhibition history
Bibliography
Medium
Painting
Image rights
Piermarq & the artist
Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson
Australian First Nation, b. 1930
Follow

Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson (or Tommy Watson for short) was a desert nomad for many years before he became a prominent figure in the Western Desert Art Movement in Australia. When he started painting, he was well acquainted with the Papunya Tula painters of the 1970s and ’80s. However, Watson differed from his peers who frequently referenced aboriginal creations myths, believing instead that painting sacred iconography was sacrilegious and deliberately adopting abstraction as his dominant style. His graphic, saturated paintings still carry a narrative weight for the artist, however, referring to the histories of his grandparents and their homeland. “I want to paint these stories so that others can learn and understand about our culture and country,” he says. Watson is also recognized as a skilled and subtle colorist—for one work he used 12 distinct shades of red.

Ngayuku Ngura, 2014

Acrylic on Belgian linen
22 × 28 in
56 × 71 cm
Sold
Location
Sydney
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