Yoshitomo Nara, ‘Untitled’, 2005, Phillips: Evening and Day Editions (June 2017)

Image: 29.6 x 22.8 cm (11 5/8 x 8 7/8 in.)
Sheet: 42.7 x 33 cm (16 3/4 x 12 7/8 in.)

Signature: Signed by both artists, dated and numbered 58/100 in pencil, published by the artists, framed.

About Yoshitomo Nara

Influenced by elements of popular culture such as anime, manga, Walt Disney cartoons, and punk rock, Yoshitomo Nara creates paintings, sculptures, and drawings of adorable-yet-sinister childlike characters. Painted with simple bold lines, primary colors, and set against empty backgrounds, these small children and animals often share the canvas with text, knives, plants, and cardboard boxes, among other recurring elements. As one of the fathers and central figures of the Japanese neo-Pop movement, Nara’s work expresses the struggle to find an identity fractured by war, rapid modernization, and an omnipresent visual culture. Nara’s sculptures, made primarily from fiberglass, and his drawings on postcards, envelopes, and scraps of paper, further this exploration using the same elegance of line and simple palette as his paintings.

Japanese, b. 1959, Hirosaki, Japan

Solo Shows on Artsy

2015
Life is Only One: Yoshitomo Nara, Asia Society Hong Kong, Admiralty

Group Shows on Artsy

2017
Sculpture, Galerie de Bellefeuille, Montreal
2017
Contemporary Magic, The Untitled Space, New York
2016
Infinite Diversity, Opera Gallery, Singapore

About Hiroshi Sugimoto

To craft his exquisite black-and-white images, Hiroshi Sugimoto uses a 19th-century-style, large-format camera, exploring his idea of photography as a method for preserving and modeling time. “Endeavors in art are…mere approximations, efforts to render visible unseen realms,” he says. Influenced by Surrealism and Dada, Sugimoto's work is intimately connected to Marcel Duchamp, as in his series "Conceptual Forms" (2004), (inspired by Duchamp's The Large Glass, 1923), large-scale black-and-white photographs of mathematical models and tools. Ongoing subjects include dioramas, theaters, Buddhist sculptures, and seascapes—the latter captured in a famous series of near-abstractions, coupled with specific geographic titles. A supreme craftsman, Sugimoto often varies the length of exposure to achieve tonal richness, as in “Joe” (2006), photographs of Richard Serra’s works that function as visual memories more than documentation. “I imagine my vision then try to make it happen, just like painting,” he says. “The reality is there, but how to make it like my reality.”

Japanese, b. 1948, Tokyo, Japan, based in New York, New York

Exhibition Highlights On Artsy

2016
Hiroshi Sugimoto - Black Box, Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam, Amsterdam
2016
Photography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Washington
2016
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Remains to Be Seen, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
2014
Hiroshi Sugimoto, Cahiers d'Art, Paris
2011
Rodin - Sugimoto, Gagosian, Paris

Solo Shows on Artsy

2016
Hiroshi Sugimoto - Black Box, Foam Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam, Amsterdam
2016
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Remains to Be Seen, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
2014
Hiroshi Sugimoto, Cahiers d'Art, Paris
2011
Rodin - Sugimoto, Gagosian, Paris

Group Shows on Artsy

2017
PREVIEW: Nach der Natur, Ludorff, Duesseldorf
2016
Photography Reinvented: The Collection of Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Washington
2016
Make Light of It, Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York
2016
Summer Salon II, The Front Gallery, Edmonton
2016
Nobuyoshi Araki / Hiroshi Sugimoto, Ben Brown Fine Arts, Hong Kong
2015
Callahan, Dawid, Sugimoto, Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York
2015
Extraordinary Photographs V, Rosier Gallery, Berkeley
2015
MAI 36 SHOWROOM, Mai 36 Galerie, Zürich
2015
Highlights from the Architecture + Design Collection, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), San Francisco
2014
Multi Panel, Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York
View Artist's CV