Yves Klein, ‘Venus Bleue (S41)’, 1962/1982, Galerie Leu
Yves Klein, ‘Venus Bleue (S41)’, 1962/1982, Galerie Leu
Yves Klein, ‘Venus Bleue (S41)’, 1962/1982, Galerie Leu

Signature: singed and numbered

Manufacturer: Éditions Galerie Bonnier, Genf.

Pierre Restany, Yves Klein, New York 1982, p. 204, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Exhibition Catalogue, Cologne, Museum Ludwig, Yves Klein, 1994-95, p. 247, no. 111, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Exhibition Catalogue, Oslo, The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Yves Klein, 1997, p. 79, no. 66, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Jean-Paul Ledeur, Yves Klein: Catalogue Raisonné of Editions and Sculptures, Paris 2000, p. 234, no. S41, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Nicholas Charlet, Yves Klein, Paris 2000, p. 231, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Exhibition Catalogue, Nice, Musée d'Art Moderne et d'Art Contemporain de Nice; Prato, Museo Pecci Prato, Yves Klein, La Vie, La Vie Elle-Même qui est l'Art Absolu, 2000-01, p. 182, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Hannah Weitermeier, Yves Klein, 1928-1962: International Klein Blue, London 2001, p. 25, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown). Exhibition Catalogue, Lugano, Museo d'Arte di Lugano, Yves Klein, 2009, p. 180, illustrated in colour (edition number unknown)

About Yves Klein

Yves Klein is best known for his trademark ultramarine pigment, which he patented as International Klein Blue in 1961. “Blue…is beyond dimensions, whereas the other colors are not,” he said. “All colors arouse specific ideas, while blue suggests at most the sea and the sky; and they, after all, are in actual, visible nature what is most abstract.” Starting in the mid-1950s, Klein made retinal blue monochromes (which would prove cornerstones of Minimalism) and the pigment would also feature prominently in his Anthropometry paintings, for which Klein smeared nude women with blue pigment and used them as human brushes on canvas, sometimes in elaborate public performances. Klein's work anticipated Conceptual art, Performance art, and environmental art, as in his selling of portions of empty space to collectors. For The Void (1958), he presented an empty gallery as an artwork, wearing a white tie and tails to show visitors around the blank walls.

French, 1928-1962, Nice, France, based in Paris, France