Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery
Zsolnay, Pècs Factory, ‘Tree of Life’, ca. C. 1900, Jason Jacques Gallery

Tall four-sided vase with low relief vegetal decoration extending from lip to base, decorated with brilliantly colored eosin luster glazes. The expressive use of plant imagery to metamorphose a geometric form into an organic one is emblematic of Zsolnay’s high szecesszió style, a national variant on a general tendency of international Art Nouveau. Depiction of entire plants, from roots to foliage, serves to decorate the elongated body as well as to evoke the enigma of life itself.

About Zsolnay, Pècs Factory

In 1853 Miklos Zsolnay established a ceramics company in which the successful mass-production of industrial and architectural wares supported an art pottery division. Zsolnay's historical revival work was on par with its competitors and was internationally acclaimed. In 1893, under the influence of Clément Massier's luster ware, Zsolnay's ceramics chemist developed a rich iridescent glaze, marketed as "eosin." Used in flamboyantly contrasting color schemes, eosin glazes were applied to detailed sculptural work and also to simple vases, achieving results that include Fauve landscapes, Tiffany-like abstraction, and applied and free-standing sculptures of women, animals, and mythological subjects. [Source: Jason Jacques]

b. 1853, based in Pécs, Hungary