Digital Art


A general category for works created using digital technology, whether in the form of tangible hardware, such as computer monitors or electronics, or software, such as graphics editors, websites, and programing languages. Sometimes termed “computer art” or “new media art,” digital art challenges boundaries between mediums. From works of early computer art like Hiroshi Kawano’s algorithmic interpretations of Piet Mondrian’s iconic gridded paintings, to programming and digital printing in the 1960s, to Cory Arcangel’s hacked Nintendo cartridge generating “Super Mario Clouds” (2002), digital art exists in a constant state of flux as technology continues to advance and transform.