Glass Objects


A category for objects composed of glass, also referred to as “glass art” or “studio glass,” as distinct from the mass-produced, functional glass used in buildings, furniture, and even some sculpture. Objects in this category are typically hand-made by expert craftsmen, using techniques such as glass-blowing, casting, bead-making, or stained glass. Glassmaking has a long history in human civilization, dating back to the 2nd millenium B.C.E. Renowned Murano glass—so-named for the small Italian island where it is produced—is made using techniques that date back to the 8th century. In the late 19th century, the Art Nouveau movement brought renewed emphasis to the artistic possibilities of the decorative arts, and glassmakers like René Lalique in France and Louis Comfort Tiffany in the United States revolutionized the field, bringing ornamental glass design to a broader public with their successful foundries. Notable practitioners today include Dale Chihuly—founder of the glass program at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)—who continues to explore novel forms and techniques in large-scale, public installations.