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The Artsy
Vanguard
2019
Vanguard
2019
The Artsy

The Artists To Know Right Now

The Artists To Know Right Now

Videos by Alex John Beck
Video Editing by Nate DeYoung
Interaction Design by Wax Studios

The landscape of contemporary art is ever-changing. It shifts according to countless factors, from artists’ principles and the political climate to auction records and collectors’ tastes. Nevertheless, each year, a new crop of ambitious artists stands out. They catapult from obscurity to ubiquity, earn representation from top galleries, garner interest from prominent collectors, and pack their schedules with exhibitions. Most importantly, they make work that expands our understanding of what art can be.

The Artsy Vanguard 2019 features 50 artists, hailing from 27 countries and working in 27 cities around the world. Ranging in age from 28 to 93, they pursue painting, sculpture, photography, filmmaking, and performance, as well as investigative research and virtual reality. They delve into topics from human rights violations to youth culture, and capture the attention of powerhouse collectors and celebrity royalty, like Beyoncé.

Artsy editors developed this list from a pool of 600 artists who were nominated by more than 100 curators, collectors, and art-world professionals. These artists represent three distinct career stages, which we’ve arranged into the following categories: Emerging, which introduces artists who recently started showing at leading institutions and galleries; Newly Established, which presents the artists making noise at major art events and gaining representation with influential galleries; and Getting Their Due, which recognizes artists who have worked persistently for decades, yet have only recently received the spotlight they deserve. The Artsy Vanguard highlights the artists paving the future of art right now.

Table of Contents
I
Emerging
II
Newly Established
III
Getting Their Due

Emerging

The Breakout Artists

Victoria Sin

Victoria Sin

B. 1991, Toronto. Lives and works in London.
Victoria Sin by Bernice Mulenga. Courtesy of the artist.

Victoria Sin by Bernice Mulenga. Courtesy of the artist.

Victoria Sin develops performances, films, texts, and installations that delve into gender, harnessing science-fiction themes to imagine alternate societal norms. Sin began performing at the London nightclub Vogue Fabrics in Dalston in 2013. Since then, they’ve captured the attention of the art world.

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Monira Al Qadiri

Monira Al Qadiri

B. 1983, Dakar, Senegal. Lives and works in Beirut and Berlin.
Monira Al Qadiri by Raisa Hagiu. Courtesy of the artist.

Monira Al Qadiri by Raisa Hagiu. Courtesy of the artist.

Through videos and installations, artist Monira Al Qadiri creates unsettling, supernatural, or kitschy atmospheres. Drawing on history, ritual, culture, and power, she shifts viewers into a new headspace. For her 2017 video installation The Craft—commissioned by Gasworks in London and The Sursock Museum in Beirut—Al Qadiri turned her childhood memories in Kuwait into a paranoid narrative in which aliens invade from the brightly lit interior of an American diner. Her distrust increasingly blossoms, addressing first her familial relationships, and then society itself.

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Diedrick Brackens

Diedrick Brackens

B. 1989, Mexia, Texas. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Diedrick Brackens by Alex Hodor-Lee. Courtesy of VARIOUS SMALL FIRES, Los Angeles.

Diedrick Brackens by Alex Hodor-Lee. Courtesy of VARIOUS SMALL FIRES, Los Angeles.

Diedrick Brackens’s woven textiles feature depictions of people and animals, embedded with expressions of black and queer identity. Last summer, he was featured in the Hammer Museum’s “Made in L.A.” biennial, and then won the Studio Museum in Harlem’s $50,000 Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize in the fall. This past spring, his work filled both a gallery show and a Frieze New York booth with L.A.’s Various Small Fires; his work entered the collection of the Brooklyn Museum; he joined the roster of New York’s Jack Shainman Gallery; and he opened a solo show at the New Museum.

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Dineo Seshee Bopape

Dineo Seshee Bopape

B. 1981, Polokwane, South Africa. Lives and works in Johannesburg.
Dineo Seshee Bopape by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of PinchukArtCentre.

Dineo Seshee Bopape by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of PinchukArtCentre.

Installation view of Solo Exhibition: Main Prize winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2017, PinchukArtCentre Kiev, Ukraine. Photo by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of PinchukArtCentre.

Installation view of Solo Exhibition: Main Prize winner of the Future Generation Art Prize 2017, PinchukArtCentre Kiev, Ukraine. Photo by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of PinchukArtCentre.

As South African installation artist Dineo Seshee Bopape’s career has taken off, her work has remained truly grounded. Her most distinctive work of the last four years has involved large-scale interventions consisting of dirt, clay, and earthen bricks. Bopape, who is represented by Sfeir-Semler Gallery, punctuates such works with videos, sculptures, and enigmatic materials and artifacts.

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Martine Gutierrez

Martine Gutierrez

B. 1989, Berkeley, California. Lives and works in New York.

At the 58th Venice Biennale, one can’t help but stop in their tracks before the work of Martine Gutierrez. The transgender Latinx photographer’s self-portraits challenge gender stereotypes, offer up new visions of pop-cultural icons, and commingle tropes of high fashion and indigenous cultures.

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Genesis Belanger

Genesis Belanger

B. 1978, United States. Lives and works in New York.
Genesis Belanger in her New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Genesis Belanger in her New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Genesis Belanger, Full Embrace, 2018. Photo by Pauline Shapiro. Courtesy of the artist and Perrotin.

Genesis Belanger, Full Embrace, 2018. Photo by Pauline Shapiro. Courtesy of the artist and Perrotin.

Genesis Belanger charmed the New York art world in the fall of 2017 with her small-but-mighty show of otherworldly ceramic foodstuffs, cigarettes, and fingers at Mrs. Gallery. Her ceramics—with lush pastel hues, matte surfaces, trompe l’oeil aesthetics, and finely hewn details—transcend the typical clay-and-glaze constructions we expect from the medium.

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Tao Hui

Tao Hui

B. 1987, Chongqing, China. Lives and works in Beijing.
Tao Hui by Mark Poucher. Courtesy of Esther Schipper, Berlin.

Tao Hui by Mark Poucher. Courtesy of Esther Schipper, Berlin.

Tao Hui remembers a childhood when he experienced much of the world through a television set. It’s a perspective that underlies his video work, where realities and fictions commingle, and identities and interactions are performed. In stilted, melodramatic scenes brought to life by actors, Tao creates fragments of narratives that hold a flame to our media-saturated world. In Joint Images (2016), a man and woman engage in hammy dialogue while a soap opera on the television behind them mirrors their scripted conversation. In Double Talk (2018), the ghost of a K-pop star reflects upon his life and legacy while a classroom of children watch through a screen.

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Jordan Nassar

Jordan Nassar

B. 1985, New York. Lives and works in New York.
Jordan Nassar by Alexander J. Rotondo. Courtesy of the artist and Anat Egbi, Los Angeles.

Jordan Nassar by Alexander J. Rotondo. Courtesy of the artist and Anat Egbi, Los Angeles.

Jordan Nassar harnesses the disarming charm of embroidery to devastating effect. His handmade works meld dramatic mountainscapes of cascading slopes saturated with color, which are overlaid with abstract patterns sourced from traditional Palestinian embroidery. Initially, Nassar generated the patterns for his work via computer and hand-stitched them himself, but he has since collaborated with female artisans in the West Bank who stitch the patterns; he then overlays the colorful landscapes.

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Geng Xue

Geng Xue

B. 1983, Baishan, China. Lives and works in Beijing.
Geng Xue by Shen Siyuan. Courtesy of Eli Klein Gallery.

Geng Xue by Shen Siyuan. Courtesy of Eli Klein Gallery.

Geng Xue’s best-known work is a stop-motion film featuring porcelain marionette figures, titled Mr. Sea (2014). The piece conjures a sensual, mystical world in which a man falls in love with a woman who turns into a monster. Though static, Geng’s sculptural figures appear to exist in states of perpetual transformation: heads that are seemingly submerged in water grow branches and bones emerge from severed legs.

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Meriem Bennani

Meriem Bennani

B. 1988, Rabat, Morocco. Lives and works in New York.
Meriem Bennani by Sunny Shokrae. Courtesy of Clearing.

Meriem Bennani by Sunny Shokrae. Courtesy of Clearing.

Installation view of Meriem Bennani, “Party on the CAPS,” at the Centre d’Art Contemporain, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and Clearing.

Installation view of Meriem Bennani, “Party on the CAPS,” at the Centre d’Art Contemporain, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and Clearing.

In 2015, the world was introduced to Fardaous Funjab (2015–17), a documentary about an avant-garde hijab designer who makes outlandish versions of the Muslim headgear: a Metallica hijab; a birthday hijab with a cake on the top. Alas, no such designer exists—she is a character concocted by Meriem Bennani. The artist was drawing upon her upbringing in Rabat, Morocco, and playing on the contemporary obsession with reality television and Instagram.

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Manuel Solano

Manuel Solano

B. 1987, Mexico City. Lives and works in Berlin.
Manuel Solano by Claudia Lozano. Courtesy of the artist and Peres Projects, Berlin.

Manuel Solano by Claudia Lozano. Courtesy of the artist and Peres Projects, Berlin.

Manuel Solano, The hottie from Starbucks, 2019. Photo by Matthias Kolb. Courtesy of Peres Projects, Berlin.

Manuel Solano, The hottie from Starbucks, 2019. Photo by Matthias Kolb. Courtesy of Peres Projects, Berlin.

Manuel Solano’s paintings are pulsating figurative scenes that picture slices of pop culture, vivid portraits, and homey environments where the artist grew up. Looking at them, you wouldn’t know that Solano went blind at age 26. Losing their sight didn’t stop the artist from continuing to paint. Now, some five years later, their work has earned them institutional shows and gallery representation: in 2018 Solano was included in the New Museum Triennial and had a solo show at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami; they are represented by tastemaking Berlin gallery Peres Projects. The artist is currently included in a show at the Palais de Tokyo, and will soon open a solo exhibition at the esteemed São Paulo nonprofit, Pivô.

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Lauren Halsey

Lauren Halsey

B. 1987, Los Angeles. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Lauren Halsey by Rafael Hernandez. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Lauren Halsey by Rafael Hernandez. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Lauren Halsey, winner of the 2019 Frieze Artist Award, created arguably the most timely artwork at the fair’s recent New York edition. At the entrance to the white tent on Randall’s Island, she erected two giant white columns to commemorate the recent death of rapper Nipsey Hussle. In such sculptures, and in the immersive installations for which she’s become known, the native Angeleno considers the black experience in her hometown. Halsey’s site-specific works are always in dialogue with their structures—she adorns columns, walls, and entire rooms with images and artifacts that infuse staid, institutional structures with new, youthful energy.

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Derek Fordjour

Derek Fordjour

B. 1974, Memphis, Tennessee. Lives and works in New York.
Derek Fordjour in his New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Derek Fordjour in his New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Derek Fordjour’s vibrant paintings entice the viewer with colorful surfaces, frequently built up with skillfully applied cardboard and newspaper. They often feature athletes, cheerleaders, and marching bands. Fittingly, last December, the artist’s sold-out presentation (with Josh Lilley) at Art Basel in Miami Beach was a gravel-covered arena with enamored fairgoers becoming his cheering crowd.

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Alia Farid

Alia Farid

B. 1985, Kuwait City, Kuwait. Lives and works in Kuwait City and San Juan.
Alia Farid by Djinane AlSuwayeh. Courtesy of the artist.

Alia Farid by Djinane AlSuwayeh. Courtesy of the artist.

Alia Farid, Vault, 2019, at the PinchukArtCentre in Kiev, Ukraine. Photo by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of the PinchukArtCentre.

Alia Farid, Vault, 2019, at the PinchukArtCentre in Kiev, Ukraine. Photo by Maksym Bilousov. Courtesy of the PinchukArtCentre.

Alia Farid’s art concerns many-faceted themes firmly enmeshed in the fabric of contemporary life. Her projects have a way of taking on lives of their own. She was tapped to curate the pavilion of her native Kuwait at the 2014 Venice Biennale of Architecture, where she presented a century of Kuwaiti modernity as it came to be shaped by the discovery of oil. But the presentation also spawned an informal school that outlived the pavilion, becoming a venue for discussing the social dimensions of architectural spaces and environments.

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Gala Porras-Kim

Gala Porras-Kim

B. 1984, Bogotá, Colombia. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Gala Porras-Kim by Weston Wells. Courtesy of the artist and Weston Wells.

Gala Porras-Kim by Weston Wells. Courtesy of the artist and Weston Wells.

Gala Porras-Kim, 11 Mesoamerican Multiple Perspectives, 2019. Photo by Ruben Diaz. Courtesy of the artist; Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles; and LABOR, Mexico City.

Gala Porras-Kim, 11 Mesoamerican Multiple Perspectives, 2019. Photo by Ruben Diaz. Courtesy of the artist; Commonwealth and Council, Los Angeles; and LABOR, Mexico City.

Gala Porras-Kim delves into the conceptual underpinnings of art, often investigating how artifacts and cultural heritage come to be considered artworks. Her work has taken her deep into the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s collection of ancient Mexican ceramics, analyzing how the meaning of such objects changed upon entering the context of an art museum. She’s also researched Zapotec, an ancient Mexican language, to consider the boundaries between visual language and drawing. These inquiries, informed by a master’s degree in Latin American studies, culminate in paintings and sculpture.

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Jonathan Lyndon Chase

Jonathan Lyndon Chase

B. 1989, Philadelphia. Lives and works in Philadelphia.
Jonathan Lyndon Chase by Coke O’Neal. Courtesy of Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles.

Jonathan Lyndon Chase by Coke O’Neal. Courtesy of Kohn Gallery, Los Angeles.

Often more than 10 feet tall and featuring glitter, bright hues, and larger-than-life subjects, Jonathan Lyndon Chase’s canvases are understandably difficult to ignore. Beyond their materiality and formal qualities, they demand attention—and visibility—for the queer black bodies they depict. For instance, the painting Butt naked dressed in nothing but pearls (2018) relishes gender nonconformity: The subject wears a beard, close-cropped hair, bright red lips, and the titular gems.

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Elle Pérez

Elle Pérez

B. 1989, New York. Lives and works in New York.
Elle Pérez by Bryson Rand. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

Elle Pérez by Bryson Rand. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

Elle Pérez, Jóse Gabriel, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

Elle Pérez, Jóse Gabriel, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York.

In March 2018, Elle Pérez’s first show at 47 Canal, titled “In Bloom,” immediately announced the artist as a new voice in photography, one that could explore the contemporary body with raw intimacy. One of the photos showed a bloody scab- and scar-lined hand resting with popping veins between two legs.

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Suki Seokyeong Kang

Suki Seokyeong Kang

B. 1977, Seoul. Lives and works in Seoul.
Suki Seokyeong Kang by Kim Young Hoon. Courtesy of Kukje Gallery.

Suki Seokyeong Kang by Kim Young Hoon. Courtesy of Kukje Gallery.

Grandmother Towers
Suki Seokyeong Kang
58th Venice Biennale

There’s a reason why many of Suki Seokyeong Kang’s abstract, found-object structures feel strangely familial, even human. Her subtly anthropomorphized “Grandmother Towers” are sculptural portraits of her late grandmother. One of the Korean artist’s sculptures—an arched construction resembling coffee tables or musical drums stacked into a craning formation—is a tender representation of her relative’s hunched-over spinal column. Imbued in these personal forms is the artist’s exploration of the relationship between individual and society; she sees her grandmother as an embodiment of Korea’s tumultuous recent history.

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Evelyn Taocheng Wang

Evelyn Taocheng Wang

B. 1981, Chengdu, China. Lives and works in Amsterdam.
Evelyn Taocheng Wang. © Evelyn Taocheng Wang. Courtesy of the artist; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; and Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

Evelyn Taocheng Wang. © Evelyn Taocheng Wang. Courtesy of the artist; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; and Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Winter,  2017. © Evelyn Taocheng Wang. Courtesy of the artist;  Carlos/Ishikawa, London; and Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Winter, 2017. © Evelyn Taocheng Wang. Courtesy of the artist; Carlos/Ishikawa, London; and Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam.

In 2017, multidisciplinary artist Evelyn Taocheng Wang released a catalog of diary entries and watercolors to coincide with her first institutional solo show, held at De Hallen Haarlem in the Netherlands. Titled Unintended Experience (A job in Amsterdam), the volume recounted the five months she spent working as a trans woman in a red-light district massage parlor.

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Jill Mulleady

Jill Mulleady

B. 1980, Montevideo, Uruguay. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Jill Mulleady. Courtesy of the artist.

Jill Mulleady. Courtesy of the artist.

Jill Mulleady, Riot on the Holodeck, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and Freedman Fitzpatrick Los Angeles/Paris.

Jill Mulleady, Riot on the Holodeck, 2018. Courtesy of the artist and Freedman Fitzpatrick Los Angeles/Paris.

There is something particularly current about Jill Mulleady’s paintings. Her vaguely surrealistic scenes entail figures who get lost in private moments on cell phones, or in substance-induced oblivion while objects take on a sinister quality. An atmospheric tension pervades the scenes, curdling the air. Valérie Knoll, who curated Mulleady’s 2017 show at Kunsthalle Bern, noted that the artist’s paintings lure us “into worlds infiltrated by an air of violence and uncanniness.” She added, “They are intense, sexual, cold, and often nightmarish.”

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Newly Established

The New Leaders of Contemporary Art

Michael Armitage

Michael Armitage

B. 1984, Nairobi, Kenya. Lives and works in Nairobi and London.
Michael Armitage by George Darrell. Courtesy of White Cube.

Michael Armitage by George Darrell. Courtesy of White Cube.

Thin seams rise up from beneath Michael Armitage’s lush, oil-painted scenes, like memories that lie just beneath consciousness. The artist paints on a traditional Ugandan bark cloth, called lugobo, which gives his surfaces intriguing inconsistencies. He draws his imagery from popular culture and his own past in Kenya, which makes for dreamlike, psychologically rich presentations. Though the artist has shown with mega-gallery White Cube since 2015, he’s currently in the spotlight as his paintings earn much-deserved acclaim at the Venice Biennale. Additionally, his first solo museum show in New York will open this October at the freshly expanded Museum of Modern Art, in partnership with the Studio Museum in Harlem.

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Ebony G. Patterson

Ebony G. Patterson

B. 1981, Kingston, Jamaica. Lives and works in Kingston and Chicago.
Ebony G. Patterson by Monique “Mogi” Gilpin. Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

Ebony G. Patterson by Monique “Mogi” Gilpin. Courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

For the first iteration of her touring solo exhibition “. . . while the dew is still on the roses . . .” in 2018, Ebony G. Patterson transformed the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) into what she called a “night garden.” Purple-and-blue floral wallpaper underpinned tapestries layered with glitter, lace, beads, drawings, and found objects like brooches and shoes. Blossoming faux-flowers and vines of ivy hung from the ceiling and clung to the walls.

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Lawrence Abu Hamdan

Lawrence Abu Hamdan

B. 1985, Amman, Jordan. Lives and works in Beirut.
Lawrence Abu Hamdan by Miro Kuzmanovic. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, London.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan by Miro Kuzmanovic. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, London.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan,  Walled Unwalled,   2018. © Lawrence Abu Hamdan. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, London.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Walled Unwalled, 2018. © Lawrence Abu Hamdan. Courtesy of Maureen Paley, London.

For Lawrence Abu Hamdan, sound is more than an art form, or even a fact of life. The self-described “private ear” uses various kinds of audio in installations, performances, and graphic works that interrogate the effects of sound on human rights—how voices are silenced, and how they can be heard and answered.

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Korakrit Arunanondchai

Korakrit Arunanondchai

B. 1986, Bangkok. Lives and works in Bangkok and New York.
Korakrit Arunanondchai in his New York studio by Lelanie Foster for Artsy.

Korakrit Arunanondchai in his New York studio by Lelanie Foster for Artsy.

Korakrit Arunanondchai, history painting (if they cannot see the happiness, at least they'll see the light),  2017. Image © Korakrit Arunanondchai 2019. Courtesy of the artist; Carlos / Ishikawa, London; Clearing, New York; and Bangkok City City, Bangkok.

Korakrit Arunanondchai, history painting (if they cannot see the happiness, at least they'll see the light), 2017. Image © Korakrit Arunanondchai 2019. Courtesy of the artist; Carlos / Ishikawa, London; Clearing, New York; and Bangkok City City, Bangkok.

Korakrit Arunanondchai’s work has always been pretty unmissable in person. He makes brashly ambitious sculptures, where twisty coils rise up from matte-black bases and loom above the heads of gallery-goers; canvases licked with images of flames; and video works that evoke the calming presence of a Thai jungle or the feverish world of a rave. In 2019, he became globally visible: His work is currently on view at the Whitney Biennial and is featured in the Venice Biennale, making Arunanondchai one of the few artists included in both shows at the same time. The artist shows with London gallery Carlos/Ishikawa, as well as Bangkok CityCity Gallery and the Brussels- and Brooklyn-based Clearing.

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Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca

Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca

B. 1980, Brasília, Brazil / B. 1975, Munich, Germany. Based in Recife, Brazil.
Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca by Chico Barros. Courtesy of Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel.

Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca by Chico Barros. Courtesy of Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel.

The creative duo that is Bárbara Wagner & Benjamin de Burca got their start only six years ago, when the two collaborated on a photographic series exploring the new middle class in Brazil. They have since developed some 10 comprehensive projects for biennials, exhibitions, and festivals around the world. Their signature works investigate youth culture and marginalized communities through a multidisciplinary practice that integrates filmmaking, anthropology, performance, music, and dance. The artists meld documentary and fiction by working in collaboration with their protagonists: rappers in Toronto; Swingueira dancers in Brazil; schlager singers in Germany.

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Charlotte Prodger

Charlotte Prodger

B. 1974, Bournemouth, England. Lives and works in Glasgow.
Charlotte Prodger by Emile Holba. Courtesy of Hollybush Gardens, London.

Charlotte Prodger by Emile Holba. Courtesy of Hollybush Gardens, London.

Installation view of Charlotte Prodger, SaF05,  at the Venice Biennale, 2019. Photo by Cristiano Corte. Courtesy of the artist; Koppe Astner, Glasgow; and Hollybush Gardens, London.

Installation view of Charlotte Prodger, SaF05, at the Venice Biennale, 2019. Photo by Cristiano Corte. Courtesy of the artist; Koppe Astner, Glasgow; and Hollybush Gardens, London.

Winner of the 2018 Turner Prize, Charlotte Prodger debuted an intimate film at this year’s Venice Biennale representing Scotland at its satellite pavillion. In this newest work, the British artist juxtaposes breathtaking shots of nature with spoken anecdotes that sound like diary entries about queer relationships and sexual encounters. The viewer must work out the connections between the disembodied voice, personal stories, and the landscape on screen. Brief pauses in the dialogue offer time for additional contemplation and looking. Titled SaF05 (2019), the work completes a trilogy that began with Stoneymollan Trail (2015) and BRIDGIT (2016).

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Jeffrey Gibson

Jeffrey Gibson

B. 1972, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Lives and works in New York.
Jeffrey Gibson in his Hudson, New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Jeffrey Gibson in his Hudson, New York studio by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Jeffrey Gibson’s punching-bag sculptures, kaleidoscopic paintings, and mixed-media works incorporate elements of traditional Native American dress and modern Western fashion. The Choctaw and Cherokee artist has become a contemporary art heavyweight over the last three years.

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Hao Liang

Hao Liang

B. 1983, Chengdu, China. Lives and works in Beijing.
Hao Liang. Courtesy of Gagosian.

Hao Liang. Courtesy of Gagosian.

Detail of Hao Liang,  Day and Night (panel II)  , 2017-2018. Courtesy of Gagosian.

Detail of Hao Liang, Day and Night (panel II) , 2017-2018. Courtesy of Gagosian.

Hao Liang’s epic contemporary take on ancient Chinese ink-wash painting has made him an art-world fixture in his home country. Hao’s work pays homage to the history of Chinese literati tradition—the scholar-painters of old who expressed their philosophies through handscrolls, portraits, and majestic landscape paintings where subtle qualities of light and shadow play out over mountain peaks and carefully cultivated gardens. In the young artist’s work, the twist is the way in which the silk paintings’ ancient origins morph into the contemporary.

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Jacolby Satterwhite

Jacolby Satterwhite

B. 1986, Columbia, South Carolina. Lives and works in New York.
Jacolby Satterwhite by Benjamin Erik Ackermann for PIN-UP, 2017. Courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash.

Jacolby Satterwhite by Benjamin Erik Ackermann for PIN-UP, 2017. Courtesy of Mitchell-Innes & Nash.

Strap on a headset and enter a VR realm of voguing ball dancers, figures in gimp masks, and leather daddies on spaceships. This is the world dreamt up by the artist Jacolby Satterwhite, who has been on a roll since emerging as one of the stars of the 2014 Whitney Biennial. In 2018, he brought an extension of Blessed Avenue (2018)—an installation with a VR component first shown at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise in New York—to Art Basel in Basel, Switzerland, for a booth with Morán Morán.

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Melike Kara

Melike Kara

B. 1985, Bensberg, Germany. Lives and works in Cologne.
Melike Kara by Diana Pfammatter. Courtesy of Peres Projects, Berlin.

Melike Kara by Diana Pfammatter. Courtesy of Peres Projects, Berlin.

Melike Kara, secret whispers, 2018. Photo by Alessandro Wang. Courtesy of the artist and Peres Projects, Berlin.

Melike Kara, secret whispers, 2018. Photo by Alessandro Wang. Courtesy of the artist and Peres Projects, Berlin.

Melike Kara’s graphic, stylized painted figures—part–futuristic frontiers-people, part–tribal civilization—have earned her a steady progression of interest from curators, dealers, and collectors alike over the past few years. In 2018, the Kurdish-German artist received her first solo show at an institution, the Yuz Museum in Shanghai. This year, she’s had solo shows at Rotterdam’s Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art and London gallery Arcadia Missa. This September she made her solo debut in New York, at Salon 94, firmly establishing her presence across the international art world. The artist also shows with Berlin’s Peres Projects.

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Cui Jie

Cui Jie

B. 1983, Shanghai. Lives and works in Beijing.
Cui Jie. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery.

Cui Jie. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery.

To walk into a Cui Jie exhibition is to enter a fantastical, futuristic city. Her paintings are imaginative, science fiction–tinged depictions of metropolises that merge Eastern and Western aesthetics. Taking architecture and furniture as source material, the artist abstracts the structures to develop novel compositions. Paintings feature chair spindles broken apart into spirals, and tubes that float against a brushy background. Aidan Li, head of the K11 Art Foundation, noted that Cui “is one of the most talented painters of her generation.”

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Firelei Báez

Firelei Báez

B. 1981, Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic. Lives and works in New York.
Firelei Báez by Lia Clay. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York.

Firelei Báez by Lia Clay. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York.

The narrative complexities of history, folklore, and personal experience collide in Dominican-American artist Firelei Báez’s energetically saturated paintings, sculptures, and installations. Afro-Caribbean women of the diaspora are the heroes of her intoxicating, symbol-laden works. The artist draws upon fiction and historical record in equal measure to reimagine the migration of these women across the globe, as well as the resilient and distinct communities that they helped build.

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Forensic Architecture

Forensic Architecture

Founded 2010, London. Based in London.
Forensic Architecture team. Courtesy of Forensic Architecture.

Forensic Architecture team. Courtesy of Forensic Architecture.

The individuals who make up Forensic Architecture have exposed the lies of the Israeli Defense Forces, Russia’s foreign ministry, and Syrian president Bashar al-Assad, along with many other powerful people and organizations. The collective, founded by Israeli-British architect Eyal Weizman, is a multidisciplinary team of architects, designers, developers, archaeologists, filmmakers, and more. Nominated for the Turner Prize in 2018, the group has been known to investigate human rights violations, launch legal battles, and reveal truths through exhibitions, journalism, and the internet.

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Tschabalala Self

Tschabalala Self

B. 1990, New York. Lives and works in New York and New Haven, Connecticut.
Tschabalala Self in her studio in New Haven, Connecticut. Photo by Julie Bidwell. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias.

Tschabalala Self in her studio in New Haven, Connecticut. Photo by Julie Bidwell. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias.

Tschabalala Self, Loosie in the Park , 2019. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery.

Tschabalala Self, Loosie in the Park , 2019. Courtesy of Pilar Corrias Gallery.

What makes Tschabalala Self such a rising star is her visionary approach to textile-based canvases, where the fabrics act as backgrounds to the painted figures. “Tschabalala brings the cutting edge of visual culture today into dialogue with a Western art-historical canon that has held as a tradition the exclusion and marginalization of the black figure,” said Legacy Russell, associate curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem, where Self has been an artist-in-residence from 2018–19.

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Harold Ancart

Harold Ancart

B. 1980, Brussels. Lives and works in New York.
Harold Ancart. © Harold Ancart. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

Harold Ancart. © Harold Ancart. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

Harold Ancart, Untitled, 2017. © Harold Ancart / SABAM, Brussels. Photo by JSP Art Photography. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

Harold Ancart, Untitled, 2017. © Harold Ancart / SABAM, Brussels. Photo by JSP Art Photography. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner.

Harold Ancart has a feverish approach to putting out work. He’s produced enough of his large-scale paintings—of matches, icebergs, and other abstracted forms—to be in 14 shows in 8 years with his New York gallery, the influential Bushwick- and Brussels-based hub Clearing. He got so restless to paint on a road trip across the United States that he built a makeshift studio in his trunk. And since signing on with mega-gallery David Zwirner in 2018, Ancart has made enough work to fill walls at fairs such as Frieze New York and Los Angeles, Art Basel in Hong Kong, ART021 in Shanghai, and FIAC in Paris.

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Getting Their Due

The Artists Finally Receiving the Acclaim They Deserve

Frank Bowling

Frank Bowling

B. 1934, Bartica, Guyana. Lives and works in London.
Frank Bowling by Alastair Levy, 2017. © Alastair Levy.

Frank Bowling by Alastair Levy, 2017. © Alastair Levy.

Frank Bowling, Two Blues, 2018. © Frank Bowling/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; DACS, London. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York; Hales Gallery, London; and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles.

Frank Bowling, Two Blues, 2018. © Frank Bowling/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; DACS, London. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York; Hales Gallery, London; and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles.

Frank Bowling is a master colorist known for his large-scale abstract compositions with evocative details layered between oozing, glowing hues. The artist, now in his mid-eighties, has been long overdue for the type of recognition he’s finally getting. After solo shows at Haus der Kunst (curated by the late Okwui Enwezor) and the Dallas Museum of Art, Bowling’s first major retrospective opened at Tate Britain in May.

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Zilia Sánchez

Zilia Sánchez

B. 1926, Havana, Cuba. Lives and works in Puerto Rico.
Zilia Sánchez with Lunar blanco, 1964, at Galerie Lelong & Co., New York, 2014. © Zilia Sánchez. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co., New York.

Zilia Sánchez with Lunar blanco, 1964, at Galerie Lelong & Co., New York, 2014. © Zilia Sánchez. Courtesy of Galerie Lelong & Co., New York.

With titles like Amazon (1993) and Antigone (1970), Zilia Sánchez’s three-dimensional paintings evoke woman warriors and ancient mythologies. Her works are minimal and metaphoric, but leave lasting impressions.

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Fred Eversley

Fred Eversley

B. 1941, New York. Lives and works in New York.
Fred Eversley by Elon Schoenholz. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Fred Eversley by Elon Schoenholz. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles.

Fred Eversley’s parabolic lens sculptures remind us of the wonder of being human in the vastness of the universe. His optically enticing works encourage self-reflection and shifts in perception.

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Tishan Hsu

Tishan Hsu

B. 1951, Boston. Lives and works in New York.
Tishan Hsu. Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong.

Tishan Hsu. Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong.

Tishan Hsu, Boating Scene 1.1.3, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong.

Tishan Hsu, Boating Scene 1.1.3, 2019. Courtesy of the artist and Empty Gallery, Hong Kong.

Tishan Hsu’s multimedia work from the 1980s and ’90s radiates a dingy, lo-fi buzz. His muted paintings feature bumps, orifices, and ridges that suggest bodies in fragments or seen through an X-ray. Some paintings protrude from the wall, given dynamic heft with layered styrofoam; a number of sculptures integrate similar corporeal motifs with bathroom tiles, carts, and cages. Looking at Hsu’s work, one might think of hospitals, basements, and old-timey computer parts. The artist has “anticipated so many concerns that younger artists are dealing with in their work today,” said Whitney Museum of American Art curator Christopher Y. Lew, “especially in relation to technology and the body.” Lew added that he believes Hsu is a role model for Asian-Americans in the art world.

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Howardena Pindell

Howardena Pindell

B. 1943, Philadelphia. Lives and works in New York.
Howardena Pindell with her work at Garth Greenan Gallery by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Howardena Pindell with her work at Garth Greenan Gallery by Alex John Beck for Artsy.

Howardena Pindell, Carnival: Bahia, Brazil, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.

Howardena Pindell, Carnival: Bahia, Brazil, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York.

Since the 1960s, Howardena Pindell has forced a “seat at the table” by exploding the traditions of painting. Working with unconventional materials like glitter, talcum powder, and perfume, the African-American artist affixes her unstretched canvases to the wall with nails in a relaxed and sumptuous pose. These tactile paintings underlie the labor-intensive practices that the artist employs to make them: Whole canvases are composed of obsessively hole-punched paper dots, or violently cut and sewn back together. However abstract or conceptual, Pindell’s work addresses personal, political, and social issues.

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Diane Simpson

Diane Simpson

B. 1935, Joliet, Illinois. Lives and works in Chicago.
Diane Simpson by Isabel Asha Penzlien. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York.

Diane Simpson by Isabel Asha Penzlien. Courtesy of the artist and JTT, New York.

Diane Simpson, Window 4, Window Dressing: Apron VI, 2003/2007. Courtesy of the artist; Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago; and JTT, New York.

Diane Simpson, Window 4, Window Dressing: Apron VI, 2003/2007. Courtesy of the artist; Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago; and JTT, New York.

Diane Simpson’s abstract constructions—made with industrial materials like fiberboard, steel, linoleum, and rivets—allude to the labor of women and to traditional forms of femininity. At the same time, Simpson challenges functionality and our ideas of domestic and industrial work. As an artist, she reveres axonometric projection, depicting three-dimensional objects on flat surfaces. In these handmade structures, Simpson has also drawn upon references including Art Deco architecture and Japanese samurai armor.

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Lorraine O’Grady

Lorraine O’Grady

B. 1934, Boston. Lives and works in New York.
Lorraine O’Grady by Ross Collab. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York.

Lorraine O’Grady by Ross Collab. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York.

Lorraine O’Grady, Rivers, First Draft: The Debauchees ignore the Woman in Red,  1982/2015. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York. © Lorraine O’Grady/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lorraine O’Grady, Rivers, First Draft: The Debauchees ignore the Woman in Red, 1982/2015. Courtesy of Alexander Gray Associates, New York. © Lorraine O’Grady/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lorraine O’Grady’s fearless determination to make the mainstream art world more accessible to black individuals can be witnessed in two particular works: Mlle Bourgeoise Noire (1980–83/2009), a guerilla performance of the artist dressed as “Miss Black Middle Class” while shouting protest poems at art happenings; and Art Is…(1983), a participatory performance during the African-American Day Parade in Harlem. In the latter piece, volunteers held up empty picture frames for the people of color watching the parade to consider themselves as art. O’Grady is best known for her performance, film, and photography exploring diaspora, hybridity, and black female subjectivity.

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Teresa Burga

Teresa Burga

B. 1935, Iquitos, Peru. Lives and works in Lima.
Teresa Burga by Sebastian Montalvo Gray. Courtesy of 80m2 Livia Benavides, Lima.

Teresa Burga by Sebastian Montalvo Gray. Courtesy of 80m2 Livia Benavides, Lima.

Teresa Burga’s most iconic project, Profile of the Peruvian Woman (1980–81), was an investigation into the lives of middle-class Peruvian women through meticulous surveys. The artist went on to display the results through a series of objects, including a colorful indigenous yarn grid (or quipu). Her brightly painted, two-dimensional female bodies from 1967 appear playful, but are meant to parody ideals of femininity. Most impressive of Burga’s practice is that she has been questioning technology and information in her art since the 1970s. A pioneer of installation, media, and technology-driven art, Burga was also a founding member of the 1960s avant-garde group Arte Nuevo, known for producing Happenings, Op art, and Pop art.

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Siah Armajani

Siah Armajani

B. 1939, Tehran, Iran. Lives and works in Minneapolis.
Siah Armajani by Paula Lobo. Courtesy of Public Art Fund, New York.

Siah Armajani by Paula Lobo. Courtesy of Public Art Fund, New York.

Inspired by vernacular American architecture, Siah Armajani designs large-scale, interactive sculptures with political resonances. After creating art for six decades, Armajani received his first American retrospective at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis last year, which then traveled to the Met Breuer this past February. That same month, his seminal installation Bridge Over Tree (1970) was re-staged in Brooklyn by the Public Art Fund (PAF). Using basic construction and materials, Armajani’s bridge challenges our notions of nature and will. PAF director and chief curator Nicholas Baume noted that the artist “transfigures everyday, utilitarian architectural forms into a poetic language, imbuing them with meaning beyond their conventional function.”

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McArthur Binion

McArthur Binion

B. 1946, Macon, Mississippi. Lives and works in Chicago.
McArthur Binion by Pasquate Abbattista. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

McArthur Binion by Pasquate Abbattista. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

McArthur Binion, Rutabaga: In the Sky, 1978-1979. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

McArthur Binion, Rutabaga: In the Sky, 1978-1979. Courtesy of the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong, and Seoul.

McArthur Binion’s work beckons you to get closer. From afar, his canvases look like painted, gridded abstractions, while suggesting hanging, knitted tapestries. Walk towards one, though, and each individual cell takes on a distinct texture, with subtle color variations throughout the composition. Binion’s works are made of paper, crayon, laser-printed images, and oil paint sticks; he builds them from personal documents, including copies of his birth certificate and pages from his address book. His oeuvre might be seen as a body of abstracted self-portraits, rendered with data.

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Beatriz González

Beatriz González

B. 1938, Bucaramanga, Colombia. Lives and works in Bogotá.

At 80 years old, painter and sculptor Beatriz González has been called one of the founders of modern Colombian art, but her international profile has grown in the past few years. Originally a figurative painter, González changed styles in the 1960s, creating vivid, colorblocked compositions based on mass media. In 1965, her painting The Suicides of the Sisga I, II and III was refused by the jury of the Salon of Colombian Artists. The artist has often dealt with violent unrest in her work, having come of age during a bloody era of Colombian history known as La Violencia.

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Simone Fattal

Simone Fattal

B. 1942, Damascus, Syria. Lives and works in Paris.
Simone Fattal by Kathleen Weaver. Courtesy of Gallery Tanit, Beirut.

Simone Fattal by Kathleen Weaver. Courtesy of Gallery Tanit, Beirut.

In exile from her home in war-torn Lebanon, Simone Fattal found grace in literature and visual art. She settled in California in 1980, started The Post-Apollo Press, and wrote and distributed experimental poetry and fiction. When not writing or publishing, Fattal has pursued an expansive art practice that includes painting, collage, and sculpture. She may be best known for her ceramics, which suggest truncated human figures and archeological ruins—forms that seem to echo the destruction and violence of her past. A love for narrative is evident in Fattal’s visual work. Ruba Katrib, curator of “Works and Days,” the recently closed retrospective of Fattal’s work at MoMA PS1, remarked that the artist “reconsiders how stories are told.”

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Vivian Suter

Vivian Suter

B. 1949, Buenos Aires. Lives and works in Panajachel, Guatemala.
Vivian Suter by Flavio Karrer. Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels, and Karma International.

Vivian Suter by Flavio Karrer. Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels, and Karma International.

In the early 1980s, painter Vivian Suter renounced the art world. Instead of hustling in major metropolises and fraternizing with dealers, she opted for a peaceful existence on the edge of a Guatemalan lake and focused on her practice. Suter arrived at a signature style: free-hanging canvases tacked to the wall or dangling from the ceiling, featuring brushy, bright, abstract designs. They suggest islands, trees, leaves, and large topographies. Her indoor and outdoor presentations envelop the viewer in soothing forms. And she’s made something of a triumphant return to the art world in recent years.

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Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor

B. 1958, Ventura, California. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Henry Taylor by Paul Forney, 2019. © Henry Taylor. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo.

Henry Taylor by Paul Forney, 2019. © Henry Taylor. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo.

Henry Taylor, Untitled, 2017. © Henry Taylor. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo.

Henry Taylor, Untitled, 2017. © Henry Taylor. Courtesy of the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo.

Nearly 20 years after he emerged on the Los Angeles art scene by making paintings on empty cigarette boxes and selling them for $80, Henry Taylor is making the best work of his life. In 2017, his large, ravishing portraits—of a black man grilling meat on his lawn; of the 32-year-old Philando Castile being shot by a Minnesota police officer—were a highlight of the Whitney Biennial in New York. Months later, his dealer Eva Presenhuber unveiled a raucous show of his portraits at her Zurich gallery, with paintings of the artist’s friends and neighbors, and of Andrea Motley Crabtree, the first female deep sea diver in the U.S. Army. (Blum & Poe has been Taylor’s primary dealer for the past decade.)

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Anna Maria Maiolino

Anna Maria Maiolino

B. 1942, Scalea, Italy. Lives and works in São Paulo.
Anna Maria Maiolino by Lívia Gonzaga Bertuzzi. © Anna Maria Maiolino. Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

Anna Maria Maiolino by Lívia Gonzaga Bertuzzi. © Anna Maria Maiolino. Courtesy of Hauser & Wirth.

Migrant, mother, global citizen—the Italian-born, Brazil-based artist Anna Maria Maiolino has explored these identities in intimate, autobiographical works that reflect her own displacement at the hand of authoritarian regimes. Maiolino’s first retrospective, at the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo, premiered in 2005. In 2017, she had a major retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. This year, the artist—who shows with Hauser & Wirth, Galeria Luisa Strina, and Galleria Raffaella Cortese—had a solo show at Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea in Milan; a new survey of her work will debut at London’s Whitechapel Gallery in late September.

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Corrections

A previous version of this article referred to Aike gallery as Aike-Dellarco; McArthur Binion’s show at the Mississippi Museum of Art, originally scheduled for this fall, is not opening until 2020; and Melike Kara is Kurdish-German not Turkish-German. The text has been updated to reflect these changes.

Clarifications

While only Beyoncé was named as the buyer of a Derek Fordjour work at Frieze New York, Jay-Z was actually the buyer; in order to fully recognize the breadth of galleries that represent the featured artists, additional gallery names have been added to the text for Beatriz González, Vivian Suter, and Diane Simpson; while the text on Henry Taylor previously referred to Eva Presenhuber as his dealer, it has been updated to reflect that Blum & Poe has been primarily representing the artist for the past decade; and mention of SculptureCenter, organizers of Tishan Hsu’s 2020 show at the Hammer, has been added to clarify their involvement with the exhibition.