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Statement

A negative space full of possibility and mutability, Beckett referred to the pause as the "vast will of unmaking." Like a fracture or crack, the pause splits a moment in two, whilst simultaneously unifying it. Similarly, in Not hours minutes, Karen Black examines the inaudible mar

Press Release

"........ Finished, it is finished, nearly finished, it must be nearly finished. [Pause.] Grain upon grain, one by one, and one day, suddenly, there's a heap, a little heap, the impossible heap. [Pause.] I can't be punished any more. [Pause.]" – Samuel Beckett, Endgame (1957)

In Samuel Beckett's play Endgame the unspoken "pause" leads to an endless play of meanings …

"........ Finished, it is finished, nearly finished, it must be nearly finished. [Pause.] Grain upon grain, one by one, and one day, suddenly, there's a heap, a little heap, the impossible heap. [Pause.] I can't be punished any more. [Pause.]" – Samuel Beckett, Endgame (1957)

In Samuel Beckett's play Endgame the unspoken "pause" leads to an endless play of meanings and indeterminacies. Beckett uses the silent pause to subvert the idea of any singular, rigid meaning; providing a kind of glitch or fracture within which to represent the unfamiliar, unknown and …

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799 Elizabeth St
Zetland, Sydney, AU